The Pact To Eradicate Coffee Farms Slave Labor 

0
96

The world’s most popular brewed coffee, which is grown predominantly in Brazil and Vietnam, was found to violate the supply chain standards set out by the World Cocoa Foundation for responsible farming. 

This means that a major producer is not upholding the ethical practices of a drink that many people drink each morning with breakfast.

The new report says that the most widely available coffee, known as “C market” beans, was likely produced using child labor and forced labor. 

On the other hand, the second wave of coffee drinkers; these are people who buy more expensive brands like Starbucks, Peet’s Coffee & Tea Co., and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, for example; are more likely to buy sustainable coffee. 

The key problem is that these sustainable brands offer the promise of ethical sourcing but in many cases fail to deliver even when they can afford it.

A study by ethical beverage entrepreneur Tony Wild found that 30% of the coffee industry was unethically sourced and therefore unethical. He interviewed managers from leading coffee roasters and buyers as well as major suppliers such as Coop Coffee, Counter Culture Coffee, Intelligentsia Coffee & Tea, and Sustainable Harvest.

These ethical standards that the WCF set out aren’t anything new; these were established by industry leaders in 2001. They include:

A list of the world’s biggest coffee producers contains some of the most well-known brands such as Kraft, Sara Lee, and Nestlé. They partner with third-party verifiers such as UTZ Certified and Rainforest Alliance to ensure that their products meet the WCF standards for ethical sourcing.

On the other hand, companies like Dunkin’ Brands and Starbucks do not participate in this program.

However, an estimated 3 million people work as slaves on coffee farms around the world to produce 60 billion bags of coffee each year. It’s a $100 billion industry. 

The Global Slavery Index claims that at least 1.5 million people are currently enslaved; Brazil has by far the most coffee farms of any country, and it is estimated that 200,000 of these farmworkers are enslaved. 

The UN has already concluded that Brazil is not doing enough to fight modern slavery, which includes coffee factory slavery.

The report on coffee plantation slave labor revealed that more than 90% of the world’s popular coffee brands fail to meet basic ethical and sustainability requirements. The report is published by the Fairtrade Foundation, which is a group dedicated to fighting for consumers and workers.

The exploitation of coffee plantation slave labor also directly impacts consumers who purchase massive amounts of cheap coffee every day in the U.S.. When these drinks are mass-produced, their ingredients are not ethically sourced and often include ingredients from coffee plantations where forced labor is used.

According to the WCF, “The world’s most popular coffee brands have failed in their commitment to protecting workers in their supply chains, a new report launched today reveals. Ninety percent of the world’s best-selling coffee brands are failing to meet basic ethical standards. 

The report, Behind the Bean: Enabling Ethical Coffee Trade, launched during the FT Commodities Global Summit in Lausanne (Switzerland), found that brands including Starbucks, Nescafé, and Illy are not doing enough to protect some of the world’s most vulnerable workers within their supply chains.”

The new report says that the most widely available coffee, known as “C market” beans, was likely produced using child labor and forced labor. 

However, sustainable brands offer the promise of ethical sourcing but in many cases fail to deliver even when they can afford it. A study by ethical beverage entrepreneur Tony Wild found that 30% of the coffee industry was unethically sourced and therefore unethical. 

He interviewed managers from leading coffee roasters and buyers as well as major suppliers such as Coop Coffee, Counter Culture Coffee, Intelligentsia Coffee & Tea, and Sustainable Harvest.

Disclaimer:  The contents of this site, such as text, graphics, images, and other materials contained on the page are for general information purposes only. This article is not a substitute for professional advice on the topics mentioned. This article does not create any form of offers to any legal or professional service. The site assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in the contents. In no event shall the site be liable for any special, direct, indirect, consequential, or incidental damages or any damages whatsoever, whether in an action to follow the content, negligence or other tort, arising out of the use of the contents of the article. The blog reserves the right to make additions, deletions, or modifications to the contents at any time without prior notice. The site does not warrant that the site is free of viruses or other harmful components. It may contain views and opinions which are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any other author, agency, organization, employer or company, including the site itself. It also does not provide professional advice, diagnosis, treatment or any legal service. The site does not endorse official procedures, legal actions or qualified services and the use of its contents are solely at your own risk.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here